Pollinator Management Resources


Strategies and tools for managing natural areas for pollinators is an area of growing interest for natural areas practitioners. On this page, you'll find a collection of resources on a range of information relevant to this topic, including papers, slides, webinar archives and links to published guidelines. We include both NAA-generated resources, and resources from our partners and collaborators that NAA has curated to be useful to our members and the natural areas practitioner community.

You can access these resources directly through the menu on the right, or scroll down to see descriptions of each. We will be adding to this page regularly.


2018 Pollinator Synthesis Paper

New Research and BMPs in Natural Areas: A Synthesis of the Pollinator Management Symposium from the 44th Natural Areas Conference, October 2017

Authors: Victoria Wojcik, Lisa Smith, William Carromero, Aimée Code, Laurie Davies Adams, Seth Davis, Sandra J. DeBano, Candace Fallon, Rich Hatfield, Scott Hoffman Black, Jennifer Hopwood, Sarah Hoyle, Thomas Kaye, Sarina Jepsen, Stephanie McKnight, Lora Morandin, Emma Pelton, Paul Rhoades, Kelly Rourke, Mary Rowland, and Wade Tinkham

To address the growing interest and expressed need for pollinator management strategies, a special pollinator symposium was held at the 2017 Natural Areas Conference, curated by William Carromero of the US Forest Service and Lisa Smith of the Natural Areas Association. The overarching goal of this symposium was to present new research and the current body of knowledge surrounding pollinator system management to practitioners, giving them the tools to better manage this essential natural resource. The topics presented showed that research is progressing in an effort to fine-tune best management practices across ecosystems.



Managing Pollinators in Natural Areas and Resource-based Competition Between Managed and Wild Bees (slides only)

Webinar in the 2018 NAA Pollinator Management Series

Speaker: Kelly Rourke, Senior Program Manager - Pollinator Partnership

Talk 1:  Managing Pollinators in Natural Areas: A Synthesis of New Research and BMPs Presented at the 2017 Natural Areas Conference Pollinator Symposium

The 2017 Natural Areas Conference Pollinator Symposium showcased new research filling gaps in our understanding of grazing and alpine forest management, as well as summaries of Best Management Practices for restoring prairies, managing honey bees, supporting monarch butterflies, and managing rangelands. 

Talk 2: Resource-based Competition Between Managed and Wild Bees

 This webinar reviews the body of research on bee competition in detail, examining methods, experimental techniques, and rigor, and presents guidance based on these findings. Only limited research has been conducted on bee competition, and it presents mixed findings; however, some consistent trends in growth limitation and reduced colony reproduction in bumble bees in the presence of honey bees provides context for management decisions.

Native Bees and Large Mammals: Vertebrate - Invertebrate Interactions in Riparian Natural Areas and Partnering with Pollinators: Prairie Restoration to Support Diverse Pollinating Insects (video archive)

Webinar in the 2018 NAA Pollinator Management Series

Talk 1: Native Bees and Large Mammals: Vertebrate - Invertebrate Interactions in Riparian Natural Areas 

Speakers: Mary Rowland, Research Wildlife Biologist, U.S. Forest Service; and Sandy DeBano, Associate Professor - Invertebrate Ecology, Oregon State University: Native Bees and Large Mammals: Vertebrate - Invertebrate Interactions in Riparian Natural Areas 

As part of a larger, collaborative project evaluating ungulate grazing management and riparian restoration at the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range (Starkey) in northeast Oregon, we examined how large mammals may influence native bees through dietary overlap. 

Talk 2: Partnering with Pollinators: Prairie Restoration to Support Diverse Pollinating Insects.

SpeakerThomas Kaye, Executive Director and Senior Ecologist at the Institute for Applied Ecology 

Restoration and management of prairie habitat in the Pacific Northwest provides an opportunity to improve conditions for many pollinators, and land managers can provide better conditions for these insects.

Management Considerations of Pollinating Bats on Wind and Solar Farms and Utility Right-of-Way Management that Supports Pollinators and Safe Energy Transmission (video archive)

Webinar in the 2018 NAA Pollinator Management Series

Talk 1: Management Considerations of Pollinating Bats on Wind and Solar Farms

Speaker: Dave Waldien, Affiliated Scholar, Christopher Newport University 

Faced with a paucity of information of both wind and solar farms impacts to pollinating bats, wind industry, land managers, and conservationists are encouraged to take a precautionary approach to the siting and operations of these facilities and proactively work with credible researchers to resolve questions. 

Talk 2: Utility Right-of-Way Management that Supports Pollinators and Safe Energy Transmission

Speaker: Peter Beesley, Vegetation Program Manager, Expert - Pacific Gas and Electric Company

This presentation will emphasize how the practical application of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) to support safe and reliable energy transmission goals also supports the federal strategy’s habitat, research and partnership goals. This information along with an overview of current and planned pollinator research that PG&E and its partners are involved with will help answer the action plan research questions that are being asked of right-of-way managers. 



Best Management Practices for Pollinators: Creating Practices that are Meaningful and Implementable for Rangelands and Calculated Floral Resource Withdrawal by Managed Honey Bees in Light of Native Bee Reproduction (Video Archive) 

Webinar in the 2018 NAA Pollinator Management Series

Talk 1: Best Management Practices for Pollinators: Creating Practices that are Meaningful and Implementable for Rangelands

Speaker: Scott Hoffman Black, Executive Director, Xerces Society

These guidelines will address the needs of native bees and butterflies, including the monarch butterfly. The Xerces Society is using a process that we developed working with the Federal Highway Administration on publications that provide guidance on the science and practice of roadside management for pollinators. 

Talk 2: Calculated Floral Resource Withdrawal by Managed Honey Bees in Light of Native Bee Reproduction

Speaker: Jim Cane, Research Entomologist, USDA-ARS Pollinating Insect Research Unit: 

Evaluating competition through replicated field experiments that manipulate hive densities and track native bee reproduction in wildlands are nearly impossible to implement at meaningful scales. I will present a new approach, looking at two metrics that can give managers straightforward tools by which to quantify the potential reproductive impact of honey bee apiaries on native bee communities

Bringing Back the Pollinators: Conservation in the Age of Climate Change

Webinar in the 2017 NAA Webinar Series

Speaker: Scott Hoffman Black, Executive Director, Xerces Society

Many practitioners and land management agencies are interested in restoring and managing habitat for pollinators. Understanding how climate change will impact both the pollinators and their habitats is vital to providing resilient habitats for long-term conservation. Scott will discuss the research on climate change and pollinators and how land managers can conserve, manage and restore habitats with climate change in mind.


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